Judgment


Judgement – Part 2

 

Yesterday, we discussed the concept of  “Judgment” using the “discriminatory” definition.

 

There are some more positive definitions of “judgment” including:

the ability to judge, make a decision, or form an opinion objectively, authoritatively, and wisely, especially in matters affecting action; good sense; discretion: a man of sound judgment. (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/judgment)

 

Therefore, we can think of judgment from two perspectives. In one use of the word we refer to the process of evaluation. In the other sense, the word connotes a process of devaluation.

 

Judgment as an evaluative process is “positive” since it is helpful for us to compare differing perspectives to make a decision or to evaluate information to make a wise decision to determine the best course of action. This sense of judgment infers using sound criteria as a part of the process. It also connotes an image of fairness and justice.

 

However, we people are labeled as “judgmental”, we imagine a person who uses judgment to devaluate. We devalue others when we engage in the practice of discrimination and prejudice. When we devalue others, we feel in some way superior to “the other”. The process of devaluing people can be extremely dangerous. In the extreme case of genocide, the side committing the atrocities devalued the group victimized by the genocide.

 

When we adopt the habit of devaluing others through judgment, we know subconsciously that other people may be “judging” us. If I am judging others, it only makes sense that someone else would be judging me. Therefore, the more judgmental we become, the more afraid we may become of being judged ourselves. It also follows that the more that we have experienced being devalued by another’s judgment, the more likely we are to feel justified in judging others.

 

The next time you find yourself judging a quality of another person, ask yourself if you are evaluating or devaluating this person.

 

I feel that this is one of the many life situations where the old saying of “do onto others as you wish others to do onto you” would apply.

 

 

 

 

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